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Substances

Bromochlorodifluoromethane
353-59-3

Where is it Commonly Found?

Dry fire suppression systems and extinguishers.
HEALTH EFFECT SUMMARY
Ozone-depleting chemicals that increases the risk of skin cancer, suspected neurotoxin, and weakens immune systems (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances).

What are its known health effects?

What are its suspected health effects?

Respiratory Toxicant (HAZMAP-CFC)

Alternative Materials

There are many ways to advoid the use of Halon in fire surpression systems.

Additional Regulatory Information

Banned in most countries in 1996 under the Montreal Protocol and banned in the US in 1993. Still found in older equipment.

Does it Correspond With Any Green Building Credits?

LEED - NC: Credits EA 4;
Green Guide for Health Care - EA 4: Enhanced Refrigerant Management;
Green Guide for Health Care - EE 4: Refrigerant Selection;
Green Guide for Health Care - CM 1.1: Community Contaminant Prevention: Airborne releases

How is it Categorized?

Ozone Depleting Gases

What is its Origin?

Banned in most countries in 1996 under the Montreal Protocol and banned in the US in 1993. Still found in older equipment.

Also known as Halon, First developed during World War II as a fire extinguisher in airplanes and tanks.

Divisions and Sections

General Reference