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Substances

Copper (for Exterior Material)
7440-50-8

Where is it Commonly Found?

Piping, flashing, asphalt roofing, electrical devices, and decorative finishes
HEALTH EFFECT SUMMARY
When copper is used as an exterior material it is a known toxic to aquatic life and a suspected toxicant in humans.

What are its known health effects?

What are its suspected health effects?

Cardiovascular or Blood Toxicant (HAZMAP) (KLAA)

Developmental Toxicant (EPA-SARA)

Gastrointestinal or Liver Toxicant (ATSDR) (DOSS) (KLAA) (ZIMM)

Reproductive Toxicant (EPA-SARA) (FRAZIER)

Respiratory Toxicant (NEME) (OEHHA-AREL) (OEHHA-CREL)

Alternative Materials

Stainless steel, galvanized steel, and paint finishes for flashing.

Additional Regulatory Information

Palo Alto, California prohibited copper roofing materials in January 2003.

Does it Correspond With Any Green Building Credits?

Green Guide for Health care - MR Credit 6: Copper Reduction

How is it Categorized?

Metals and Metal Compounds

What is its Origin?

Palo Alto, California prohibited copper roofing materials in January 2003.

Copper is a chemical element (symbol Cu) that is a ductile metal with excellent electrical conductivity.

Divisions and Sections

Div 04 Unit Masonry

Div 05 Decorative Metal

Div 05 Decorative Metal Railings

Div 07 Insulated-Core Metal Wall Panels

Div 07 Metal Plate Wall Panels

Div 07 Metal Roof Panels

Div 07 Metal Shingles

Div 07 Metal Wall Panels

Div 07 Asphalt Shingles

Div 07 Built-Up Asphalt Roofing

General Reference

http://cfpub.epa.gov/ncea/iris/index.cfm?fuseaction=iris.showQuickView&substance_nmbr=0368